About Ivan Pili

 Ivan Pili is a figurative artist born in Cagliari in 1976. His artistic vocation is a hyper-realistic figuration that goes beyond the pure representation of reality.

From an early age, Ivan Pili was interested in the arts. He was often caught drawing secretively during his grade school classes. He rather incidentally discovered his propensity for music and quickly began working to establish himself as an international musician.

Ivan Pili competes with reality every day.
Painting is for him a kind of ‘holy inspiration" that becomes a message on canvas.
It is a magnificently painted celebration of form rather than colour.

You have to get very close to his art to discover that they are not born of camera but out of a desire for proportions, for the smallest details that can be read, for the essential that is visible to the eyes, very painstaking that looks at the proportions, at the smallest visible details.
What is the difference between a painting by Ivan Pili and a photograph? The latter is born from a neutral photographic lens, while Pili’s elaboration arises from his soul, from the void, mirror of his and our infinite feelings and emotions.
 

Black and white - Shadows in the foreground

Ivan Pili has always aspired so that "his" black and white could have the power to generate immediate tension, to create "disorientation", to communicate without the need for further intermediaries other than themselves.

In his paintings you don’t even need a shape, you don’t need realistic and recognizable backgrounds, there is no need for clarifying words; there is no need but to let oneself be invested by the pure message entrusted to the dim light. These two colours are "the edges" of the chromatic circle: white contains all the colours and recalls the idea of fusion and bright union; black is instead an absence of colour and should therefore be linked to the idea of emptiness, darkness, absence.

But not in the paintings of Ivan Pili, as it is black that is placed on the foreground, also reversing the typical canons of photography: in his paintings, it is black that dominates, while white is "simply" a support. In his works these "non
colours" act on the perceptual system of the observer and communicate much more than their traditional meanings; eye and mind are activated and interact with the (unconscious) search for deeper senses, worlds, intimacy, mysteries revealed by the perfect interlocking of white light and black light.